Henbury Overhaul Update – November 2020

Henbury’s overhauled rolling chassis has now been reunited with the boiler, allowing re-assembly to continue.
In order to do this, the temporary track was extended out of the workshop, and a commercial crane was employed to turn the frames through 90 degrees and onto the quayside track. Portbury was able to bring the boiler on its trolley down to the quayside, where it was lifted into the frames. It was nearly dark by the time the operation was completed.
Lastly, Portbury took her old stablemate back to the running shed.


Photos courtesy Bob Edwardes, with thanks.

Mayflower’s Boiler Lift

On Thursday 20th August 2020, steam tug ‘Mayflower’s boiler was lifted back into place. As the museum and working exhibits have been closed during the Coronavirus crisis, it was nice to be able to have them alive again. All volunteers taking part were complying with COVID-19 restrictions throughout. The lift went very smoothly, a credit to all involved. Hopefully this means the 159-year old Mayflower can be in steam again soon!

Cranes stand ready in the morning, the weather held out for us thankfully (photo courtesy Bob Edwardes)
‘Portbury’ was in steam again, seen here shunting the yard to enable the boiler to be brought out of the running shed
Crane 32 was in charge of the lift, its higher capacity of 10 tons being ample for the 8-ton boiler
The first task was to lift off ‘Mayflower’s wheelhouse, exposing the engine room below.
‘Portbury’ brought the boiler down to the quayside
The boiler awaiting fitting of the smokebox
The boiler alongside Crane 32, showing the fresh lagging (photo courtesy Bob Edwardes)
The smokebox (which has been renewed with fresh metal to replace rotten parts) fitted to the boiler.
The boiler is eased into ‘Mayflower’ (photo courtesy Bob Edwardes, with thanks)
The boiler is eased into its cradle
Lined up successfully with its mounting points
Crane 32 getting ready to detach from the boiler and lift the superstructure back on (photo courtesy Bob Edwardes, with thanks)
Job done for the day, ‘Portbury’ did some more shunting before heading back to the shed.

Henbury’s Boiler Returns

Good news as Henbury’s boiler has arrived back at M-Shed. I believe this boiler dates from 1955 as it was a new one fitted to ‘Mackenzie’ which had the winged smokebox front typical of earlier Pecketts. In or around 1960, the boiler was fitted to ‘Henbury’ which previously had a straight smokebox front.

Lots of steps still to go through on re-assembly but the boiler is one of the biggest hurdles in any overhaul!

Restoration Updates – April 2019

Lots has been going on, ‘Portbury’ has just finished working the busy Bank Holiday weekend.

A few weeks ago the Steam Crane’s jib was re-painted.

The Turbot’s vacuum brake cylinder was due for overhaul, so in March it was shunted out of the service train and outside the shed, where the work was carried out.

Here it is, freshly refurbished.

The BD open wagon’s repaint is pressing ahead. The planks still have a few years left in them so since the wagon won’t be carrying much in the way of loads, the scabby looking planks were simply turned around in situ.

 

Wagon Restoration Update – March 2019

The next wagon to be overhauled at M Shed is the LSWR 8 plank open mineral wagon, built 1921 and numbered as BD 27.

The below pictures show it shortly after being shunted into the shed, Bob is tracing the sign writing to use as a template later. Since these photos were taken several planks have been removed for replacement.

GW Ballast Wagon Restoration

Pictures from this morning of the latest wagon to go through the workshop, the GW Ballast Wagon (BR telegraphic code ‘Starfish’).

The running gear is being cleaned up and red oxide primer applied, while the black painted bodywork is being signwritten by Bob Edwardes.

GW Ballast Wagon in the Running Shed 29/1/2019

This wagon was the victim of a graffiti attack a few years ago, which obliterated the text on this side. Bob was able to trace the existing text on the North facing side, then apply chalk to the rear of the tracing paper, which leaves a witness mark on the wagon when traced over. This gives the outline for the text.

More wagon restorations

Exciting times at the BHR! Following on from the Sulphuric Acid tanker, the team are wasting no time and have also completed a cosmetic restoration of flat wagon number 31568, an ex-PBA tank wagon chassis.

Pictured here in company with the MOGO and the tank wagon.

The flat wagon is currently carrying a component of the next one to undergo refurbishment, the cover for ex-GWR ‘Starfish’ ballast wagon, built 1936 at Swindon.

Pictured here a few years ago: